How to Get Credit Cards for Poor Credit History

Due to different situations, the average person has poor credit at different times in their life. Research shows one in seven Americans has credit scores below 600 with one in ten having a rate between 600-650. Both of these scores are considered poor for lenders and financial institutions!

Several ways to get a credit card when you have poor credit history even with a low credit rate.

The important facts to know about obtaining a credit card are how financial institutions view their applicants. The My Account Access Login address is www.myaccountaccess.com/onlineCard.do/

Financial institutions want to provide credit cards to people that are stable. This means employment and residence. They want their applicants to work their job for at least one year. This little secret fact eludes many people but it is very important to know.

You can obtain unsecured credit cards with companies such as PREMIER Bank or Centennial Bank. They are frequently offering credit cards to poor credit customers. The internet has a dedicated website for these cards so check it out and get on the road to having a credit card.

Both of these credit cards have a low credit limit but after making timely payments your credit limit will be raised. The timely payments are reported to the credit bureau to help improve your credit rating.

Many customers are familiar with the Elan Credit Card Login access which can be used to access the cardmember service online anytime.

One common method to get a credit card is to have someone with good credit apply for a credit card and list you as an authorized user.

You can then be responsible for the entire credit card balance and fees but under their name and good credit. This will help you get a credit card and improve your credit rating.

Secured credit cards are another option. These are cashback credit cards with money deposited to cover the number of charges on the credit card. After a period the money deposited will be returned when you show the company you’re no longer a credit risk.

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